Posts filed under ‘Business Development’

DHL Expands Its U.S. Hub at Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky Airport

$22.5 Million Expansion to Enhance International Services, Meet Growing Demand of Shipping Customers

PLANTATION, Fla.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–DHL, the world’s leading logistics company, announced today it will invest US $22.5 million to expand its hub facility at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky airport to meet the growing demands of international shipping customers.

Starting in March 2011, DHL will build on 19 acres of land leased from the CVG Airport authority to expand its existing aircraft parking apron and construct nine new aircraft gates. The expansion will enable parking for nine additional wide-body aircraft that will connect the United States to points in Asia, Europe and the Americas.

“As businesses increasingly go global to capitalize on emerging trends in international trade, the expansion at our CVG hub will position DHL to accommodate the growing needs of our importing and exporting customers,” said Ian Clough, CEO for DHL Express U.S.

All new aircraft gates will include a hydrant jet refueling system for a more efficient refueling operation as well as the capability to de-ice aircraft directly at the gate. Construction will continue through September 2011.

This is the second phase of a two year, $40 million investment to enhance DHL operations at the Cincinnati hub which includes equipment upgrades and various facility improvements. In October 2010, DHL announced a $12.5 million project to upgrade existing hardware and software applications running its auto sort system, improving the speed and reliability of shipment scanning and sorting as volumes grow at the Cincinnati hub. The CVG hub handles about 90% of the DHL volume that enters the U.S.

The investment also represents DHL’s continued commitment to the U.S., a key component of its powerful global network. In the past two years, DHL restructured its U.S. Express division, focusing on its core international shipping specialty and implementing an extensive Certified International Specialist training program to ensure all employees are experts in the intricacies of international trade and transportation. The company also added an entirely new selection of Time Definite import and export express services and flights to the U.S. from Paris and Frankfurt to further expand next-day service from key points in Western Europe. Read More

February 14, 2011 at 8:33 am

How U.S. Businesses Can Really Win in India

Western outfits looking to sell products should forget “glocalization” and embrace reverse innovation

After this month’s midterm election results, which showed voters single-mindedly concerned about jobs and the economy, President Obama quickly rebranded his trip to India and other Asian countries as a trade mission. The goal of the trip, he said, was to stimulate overseas demand for American goods and services.

It’s certainly true that, for many U.S. businesses, emerging nations present rich growth opportunities. In China, India, and elsewhere in the developing world, rising prosperity is expanding the market for consumer goods from high-tech razors to high-tech cars. But the traditional way of serving those markets suffers from flaws that eventually limit the growth potential.

Typically, multinational companies create stripped-down versions of products developed for Western consumers. They then offer these products in the developing world at a reduced price. To do this requires removing certain premium features or bells and whistles, and perhaps substituting lower-cost materials. Even so, the prices such products command are often unaffordable by all but a small percentage of people at the top of the local markets’ income pyramid.

In this model, innovation flows in only one direction: downhill, from the headquarters of the multinational corporation out into the world. The same basic products made for the developed world are modified for poor-world consumption, mainly through de-featuring and substitution.

“Glocalization” Fizzles
This strategy is called “glocalization.” But while the word “local” is embedded in the name, in truth there is very little locally relevant insight reflected in the design of glocalized products. Thus, after an initial flurry of sales made largely on the cachet of the multinational’s global brand, the approach fizzles. As one Indian executive told us: “Emerging nations used to aspire to have rich-world products. Now they want rich-world quality in their own products.”

In the end, businesses that practice only glocalization will fail to exploit the full emerging-market opportunity—to the detriment of their bottom lines and the economy as a whole. Read More

Source: V. Govindarajan and L. McCreary, Bloomberg BusinessWeek, November 16, 2010

December 1, 2010 at 9:30 am

U.S. Businesses Urged to Promote Trade (source: www.americanshipper.com)

The ranking member of the U.S. House Ways and Means Committee urged business owners and managers attending the National Foreign Trade Council’s annual dinner in Washington on Wednesday to talk to their employees about the benefits of trade.
Read More

October 4, 2010 at 10:03 am

What Border Officials Can Do With Your Laptop And Cellular Phone

Having your laptop searched or detained by Customs on your way back from a business trip would be a nightmare for most business people. This scenario is quite possible under new governmental policies. In fact, it is becoming so frequent that last August, Customs and Border Protection (“CBP”) and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (“ICE”) both issued their respective new policies on border searches of electronic devices. It was a coordinated effort of CBP and ICE to update and harmonize their border policies to detect an array of illegal activities, including terrorism, cash smuggling, contraband, child pornography, copyright, and export control violations. Link

Source: porterwright

February 23, 2010 at 8:00 am

China’s longs market continues to fluctuate

SteelOrbis – Over the past week China’s domestic long products market has retained its fluctuating trend,with a minor slide observed in market prices in most regions and a small climb in some individual markets.

Affected by poor market demand,longs prices in the eastern China market posted an overall declining trend in the past week,which was also caused by the decrease in the steel futures market in the first half of the week. Nevertheless,given the support of high cost levels,the market has not fallen sharply. By the end of December 10,rebar inventory in Shanghai reached 460,000 mt,neutral week on week; meanwhile,wire rod inventory in Shanghai stood at 98,000 mt,up by 5,000 mt week on week.

Driven by the Shanghai market as well as by the decrease in the steel futures market,long product prices in the south registered a minor decline on the whole during the first half of the week; subsequently,however,the market began to see a certain improvement following the recovery of the steel futures market. (Alibaba Group,6 Dec 2009 02:53:24 PST)

Read More

December 17, 2009 at 8:00 am

Global Technology Companies Protest Chinese Procurement Law

Global technology, service and manufacturing companies are raising concerns to the Chinese government over new rules they fear could restrict or block foreign vendors from selling high-tech gear to China’s government agencies. More than two dozen major industry groups from North America, Europe and Asia — representing most of the world’s major technology companies — sent a letter Thursday to Chinese ministries saying they were “deeply troubled” by the Chinese requirement.

The new rule requires vendors to gain accreditation for their products before they can be included in a government procurement catalog of products containing “indigenous innovation.” Companies that aren’t listed in the catalog will theoretically be allowed to bid for government contracts. But those that are listed will apparently be given preference.

At stake are billions of dollars of Chinese government spending on personal computers and application devices, communication products, office equipment, software and energy-efficient products. (By LORETTA CHAO, The Wall Street Journal, DECEMBER 11, 2009)

Read More

December 14, 2009 at 8:00 am

Payment Options for International Transactions

You and your customer will assess many factors as you negotiate the payment term that will be used for your international transaction. They include, but are not limited to:
Value of the transaction;
Your relationship with your customer, new or long-standing;
The country where the goods are destined;
The buyer’s country’s rules about how money will be released to you, the seller; and
Whether the product being shipped is customized, built to specification, or off the shelf.
The global economy is fluid; firms will benefit from regularly examining its own customer base and assessing political, credit and foreign-exchange risks to determine which payment term best suits the situation. There are several sources that provide background information on the buyer’s country and their economy. Options that are available on the internet include:

Read More

December 8, 2009 at 8:00 am

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Travel with the Northern Kentucky Chamber in 2012

Peru - August 12-20, 2012
To learn more about the program, please email Kyle Horseman or call 859.426.3653.

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